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We are now looking very close to the work. The scratches on the surface are from 120 grit sandpaper created when the boxwood sheet was sanded to thickness. Make several light cuts and once you have a defined cut, increase the cutting pressure and deepen the stop cut. Starting at the laser mark below the stop cut, cut a channel to the bottom of the stop cut. Now round the outer edge, start in the upper corners and cut to the center, as aposed to one sweeping cut from end to end. You will have better control of the shape if you cut towards the center. Continue rounding the outer edge until you have a sharp edge at the first cut. This edge will be rounded later but it will be a basic defining detail.
click on photo for a larger view

click on photo for a larger view
The same steps for the first fold are now repeated for the next one in the lower left. Cut along the laser mark several times for a sharp stop cut. Then cut the grove. Go back and round out the first edge. Start rounding out the edges of the folds at this point. The reason is, as the drape begins to take a rounded shape the groves become shallow. You may need to deepen the groves as you go. Create the last bottom fold with vertical a stop cut and horizontal shaving. Round out the entire left side of the drape. You can see the groves get smaller as the drape is rounded. We don't want sharp defined edges in this part of the drapes, we want soft rolls with slim folds as detail. Once the drape is finished go back with a slim pointed surgical blade and clean out any chips or slivers left behind.

Working the right lower section of the drape is a matter of rounding the outer edge. Make a stop cut to the right where you want to stop the left side of the drapes. Keep rounding the edge until you have reached the laser mark. Blend the sections into rolling folds by scraping a blade over the entire drape.


click on photo for a larger view

click on photo for a larger view

Stepping back from the carving and taking an over all look. We see the shapes of the details are all in proportion to each other. Taking a long, narrow, pointed surgical blade very light and delicate cuts can be made to give the folds in the upper section of the drapes a rounder and better flowing shape. Breaking the tips off carbon steel surgical blades gives a great edge for scraping. The use of scraping the carving to remove material is done only with the grain. If you go against the grain the wood tends to chip or rip the grain, these chips are micro small but the finish is noticed at normal viewing. Go back to part one photo 4 center picture. Here you can see the rough fuzzy surface created by scrapping against the grain. Again you are looking supper close at the surface but at normal view the carving looses the sheen or smoothness of the wood. It will maintain a "texture" from the scraping against the grain.

Carving the flower has to be done with a light touch. The petals are so small it is easy to chip the edges. Once a chip happens you can loose a major part of the design. The chip problem can be corrected but you have to shave the flower down below the chip to remove it. This may also require going back to the drapes and cutting them down. So its best to be careful when cutting. Begin with a cut between the petals, then with the very tip of the blade cut depth to the petal. Continue around the flower petal at a time making a cut then cutting down the level of each petal. The surface of each petal is not flat but has a slight bowl shape. You would not think such a small indent makes a difference but it does add depth.
click on photo for larger view

click on photo for larger view
There are two ways to carve the flower, one way is to cut every other petal at a different level. So you have one low one high one low so on. Or as I did, cut the flower petals like a pin wheel. One edge is cut deep while the other edge is left higher, as you work around the flower you maintain a sharp edge between the petals. This method creates the shadow affect and giving the carving the deeper 3D look.
Once again pan back and take an over all look to be sure everything is flowing together and no one part is standing out.
click on photo for larger view

Go to PART 4

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